Poetry & Social Justice: A Dialogue w/ Poet Enzo Surin

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Enzo Surin is a Haitian-born poet​, publisher​, and social advocate, and the author of the chapbook, HIGHER GROUND (Finishing Line Press, 2006). His poetry​ is forthcoming and​ has appeared in publications such as ​The BreakBeat Poets anthology, Ozone Park Journal, sx salon, Tidal Basin Review, Reverie: Midwest African American Literature, The Caribbean Writer, among other literary journals. ​Surin hold an MFA in Creative Writing and currently serves as Assistant Professor of English at Bunker Hill Community College.​ He is also founder and publisher at Central Square Press, a small, independent, literary press that publishes poetry with a commitment to African-American, Caribbean and Caribbean-American communities. (25:53)


Visit Enzo’s Website

Follow Enzo on Twitter @enzothepoet

REMINDER: The deadline for The Postmasters Podcast Short Story Contest is 14 February! The prize is $100 and a chance to read the winning story as part of our April episode. No entry fee! Submit today!

Highlights

To kick off the episode, Enzo reads a new WIP poem for us, titled Trace Commodity, inspired in part by the recent controversial events in Ferguson, Missouri and “cities like it.”

On his inspiration for a given poem…

“The piece I just read to you… there’s always endless news cycles about violence happening in different states, and I always consider what’s happening to the folks after what I call the trauma of the violence. When the news are gone, when the protests are gone, when the trials are done, whether or not the person is found guilty or not guilty, people are still dealing with the trauma and the effects of the situation. I focus more on the individual, the aftermath of everything else.” Continue reading

19. Peace, Translation & Diversity: A Dialogue w/ Poet Andrea Beltran

Andrea_Beltran

Andrea Beltran is a poet currently living in El Paso, Texas. She is a graduate student at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, and her poems have recently appeared in Luna Luna, Word Riot, Mom Egg Review, Superstition Review, and Acentos Review. (26:41)


Read Andrea’s Blog
/Follow Andrea on Twitter @drebelle

And we announce our first Postmasters Podcast Short Story Contest! Submissions are now open. Send us your fiction before Valentine’s Day 2015!

Highlights

“I wish I could say that I’m one of those writers who, you know, wakes up every morning and has a set routine… I tend to be a binge writer. I find I’m more at peace with that.”

“[VCFA] has changed my life… I’m so grateful I got over my fear and just did it. I feel a lot more comfortable with my writing now than I ever have. But I feel like I’m a better reader, and I think, coming away from VCFA, that’s what I’m most proud of.”

“I am very nervous to work with [Rigoberto González], if I do get to work with him, but I feel it will probably be the most rewarding semester… He expects a lot from his students, and I feel like I need–and I want–that challenge at this point in my writing… I also have not [yet] been able to study with a Latino writer, which is very important to me.” Continue reading

18. Gifts for Writers: Ask Audrey & Lacy

Postmasters_December2014

We’ve got our list–for Santa and our listeners–of great Christmas gift ideas for writers! If you’re shopping for a writing friend, or if you’re a writer who needs to inspire those who love you in this season of gift-giving, you don’t want to miss this episode {26:40}.

 

#1 A DIY Writing Retreat

Time, space, and money. It’s hard for anyone to get her hands on all three at once. Gift your favorite writer a couple of nights away! Find an affordable hotel (we also suggest exploring AirBnB for options) and book a weekend someplace easy enough for the writer to reach without too much travel time or personal expense, but far enough away for him or her to feel as though she has retreated from real life and can truly create!

#2 Out of Print Clothing

These folks put cool, bookish images on t-shirts, tote bags, etc. Darling options for both men and women. Don’t forget to check out the Poe-ka-dots Collection! Visit outofprintclothing.com today to take advantage of their Cyber Monday deals.

#3 Book Store Gift Cards

Far from being the worst, most impersonal gifts in the world, gift cards from book stores are usually a big hit with the writing crowd. Really, what you’re saying when you give a book store gift card to a writer is:

“I understand that this is your thing and that you have very nuanced tastes that I can’t even begin to predict. So, please, have at it! Go wild with whatever you want to buy!”

And please don’t use Amazon. Shopping for books at Amazon is like under-cutting every would-be author’s future in publishing. The best option is to patronize your local, independent bookseller, but we know online shopping is extremely convenient. We recommend that you look to BookDepository.com (They ship for free worldwide!) or ABEBooks. Continue reading

17. Voices Not Her Own: A Dialogue w/ Author Frances Kay

Frances Kay Dollywagglers

Frances Kay lives in Wales and Ireland. She writes plays for children for The Ark Children’s Centre, Dublin, Theatre Lovett, ‘The Morbegs‘ on RTE [Irish national television], BBC TV’s ‘You and Me‘ children’s programmes, and Siamsa Tire Theatre in Kerry. Her novel for adults, ‘Micka‘ (published by Picador) was runner up for the Society of Authors’ 2011 McKitterick Prize, and was featured on BBC Radio 4’s ‘A Good Read‘ programme. Her new novel, ‘Dollywagglers‘, is published by Tenebris Books. She also writes romances under the name of Pan Zador; two novels, ‘Act of Love’ and an erotic version of Thomas Hardy’s ‘Far From the Madding Crowd’ were recently published by Crimson Romance. (26:42)


Highlights

“I like to write in voices that aren’t me.”

“I started when I was twelve. I got a typewriter for my birthday, and I immediately thought, I’m going to write a novel!”

“The work I do for children is very honest and I tackle difficult subjects–I’ve looked at suicide in a play for teenagers–but I also believe in giving them optimism and hope.”

“My aim in writing [‘Micka’] was to get adults to see how two boys of that age can grow up with no compassion… of course, it’s a lot to do with their upbringing.”

On working with a niche publisher [Grimbold Books]:

“I wanted a new, young publishing house… I found from day one, as soon as Zoë said she liked the book and wanted to publish it, it was a wonderful journey. I felt really taken care of as a writer, because they [Sammy Smith and Zoë Harris] are both writers and they understand the creative process.”

On her writing process:

“Well, you can forget consistency and discipline!”

“Writing is one of the very few things that gets better the older you get.”

You don’t want to miss Frances speaking to us as her alter ego Pan Zador!

Who’s Who

George Orwell, author of 1984

Joan Littlewood, called “The Mother of Modern Theater”, producer of Oh, What a Lovely War!

Murder of James Bulger, case involving the two youngest convicted murderers in modern British history

Eimear McBride, author of A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing

Closing Quote

If the book we are reading does not wake us, as with a fist hammering on our skulls, then why do we read it? Good God, we also would be happy if we had no books and such books that make us happy we could, if need be, write ourselves. What we must have are those books that come on us like ill fortune, like the death of one we love better than ourselves, like suicide. A book must be an ice axe to break the sea frozen inside us. ~ Franz Kafka, someone “quite mad”

16. Practice & Patience: A Dialogue with 2014 Masters Review Author Drew Ciccolo

Drew Ciccolo Masters Review

Drew Ciccolo, a 2014 graduate of Rutgers University-Newark’s MFA Program, won Talking Writing‘s 2013 prize for creative non-fiction. His story “The Behemoth” was selected by Lev Grossman for the 2014 anthology, The Masters Review. A first-year PhD candidate in the Rutgers-Newark American Studies program this fall, he will study, among other things, representations of culture and socialization in fiction containing non-mimetic elements. His website is forthcoming.


Giveaway Details

We’re giving away two copies of the The Masters Review Volume III, which opens with Drew’s story, The Behemoth. To be entered in the drawing, leave a comment on this blog post or on the Facebook post. Click here to like The Postmasters Podcast on Facebook! We’ll announce the winners later this month.

Highlights

On the MFA Draft Facebook Group group…

“You get a feel for what schools people are applying to… I definitely noticed people supporting each other and boosting each other’s spirits, and that seemed like a good thing.”

On choosing Rutgers’ MFA program…

“I applied to either 11 or 13 programs. [On Facebook,] I saw that people were worried about the cost of application. I’ll suck it up on the application costs if it means I could get some kind of a funding package somewhere.”

On patience as a writer…

“Most people [at the start of the MFA] hadn’t even written ten stories, me included. If you put that in the context of a writing life, it’s really just the beginning.”

Advice to people considering an MFA…

“When MFA faculty are looking at applications, they’re trying to find people, not who have written the most polished story, but they’re looking for people who… if they were they to work with this person, some good would come out of it.”

Who’s Who

The Masters Review

Donald Barthelme

Steven Millhauser

Justin Taylor

Jayne Anne Phillips

Rutgers University MFA Program

University of Florida MFA Program

Akhil Sharma

Alice Elliott Dark

Paige, Drew Ciccolo’s personal essay won Talking Writing‘s 2013 prize for nonfiction

James Goodman

Closing Quote

In this there is no measuring with time, a year doesn’t matter, and ten years are nothing. Being an artist means: not numbering and counting, but ripening like a tree, which doesn’t force its sap, and stands confidently in the storms of spring, not afraid that afterward summer may not come. It does come. But it comes only to those who are patient, who are there as if eternity lay before them, so unconcernedly silent and vast. I learn it every day of my life, learn it with pain I am grateful for: patience is everything! ~ Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

15. Essay Therapy: A Dialogue w/ Nonfiction Writer Suzanne Hegland

suzanne_hegland

Suzanne Hegland completed her MFA in Nonfiction at Lesley University in 2011. Something of a perpetual student, she also holds a Master’s in History and a Master’s in Education. Founder of Essay Therapy, Suzanne has combined her deep knowledge of what goes on “back stage” in higher education with her love of teaching and her passion for narrative nonfiction to work with students on the dreaded college application essay. Suzanne teaches College Writing and is the Director of the Writing Center at New England Conservatory in Boston. When she’s not talking about writing to musicians, she plays the role of Associate Dean of Students. Suzanne’s work has appeared in The Boston Globe, The World Scholar, Femamom, The Huffington Post, and Creative Nonfiction. She claims to be working on her manuscript Comfort Measures Only, and sometimes this is true. {27:54}

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14. Mysticism & Maturity: A Dialogue with Author Stephanie Reents

stephanie_reents

Stephanie Reents is the author of The Kissing List (Hogarth, 2012). Her work has appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories, Best of the West, Epoch, StoryQuarterly, Gulf Coast, Pleiades, and Denver Quarterly, among other places, and been noted in Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize. She earned her MFA from University of Arizona and has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, a Stegner Fellowship, and a MacColl Johnson Fellowship for fiction from the Rhode Island Foundation. An Associate Professor of English at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, Stephanie lives in Cranston, RI with her husband and multiple cats.

 

Stephanie’s website: stephaniereents.com

Highlights

On the creation of The Kissing List

“I was sifting through the stories on my hard drive–because I didn’t want to start working something new–seeing if there was anything partially finished that I could attempt to finish. I realized that I had been writing a number of stories about young women, without being fully cognizant of it, and it suddenly made sense to me: Why don’t I have a collection of stories about young women figuring out that decade after they graduate from college?

“It wasn’t a collection of interconnected stories. The connecting of the stories didn’t happen until after the collection had been acquired by the publisher. My editor suggested that I try connecting the stories, which was very psychologically challenging.”

On writing mystical, unreal stories…

“Any writer knows that you have to use your own life for scale… We use the places we know, and we use some of the experiences we’ve had, to create the texture of verisimilitude or believability in a story or novel. So, I definitely draw from experiences I’ve had or places I’ve lived in order to make things feel believable, to give the story the texture of something that’s real, even if it’s obviously not real.” Continue reading